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CDU Library Referencing Guide: Referencing FAQ

Find your referencing style and learn how to reference correctly

Referencing

How do I reference properly?

When you find material to use for essays and assignments you must reference (cite) it correctly. Whilst studying at CDU you are expected to write to an acceptable academic level. You will need to develop skills displaying academic integrity, which means being honest about your ideas and sources. Referencing, when done correctly acknowledges the work of others and will prevent you from accusations of intellectual theft and plagiarism.

There are many referencing styles (APA, CDU Harvard etc): ensure you know the style required for your course.  The library has examples of how to reference books, articles, web sites etc for the the different referencing styles.

It allows the reader to follow an idea, using the details provided, to locate the original publication. This could be because the reader is interested in the topic or because they wish to verify the details of the quotation, making sure the author hasn't been taken out of context.

See the CDU Library tab on Plagiarism. This provides links to CDU policies regarding plagiarism and some resources to help you avoid it.

What details do I need?

It's important to familiarise yourself with the required referencing style early.  This is so you know what details to record from the material you find so that you can actually reference it.  You can download a template here to help you record the required details.

Always check with your lecturer which style you should use, as they may have their own preferences on which style you should use.

Why Reference?

Whilst studying at CDU you are expected to write to an acceptable academic level. You will need to develop skills displaying academic integrity, which means being honest about your ideas and sources. Referencing, when done correctly acknowledges the work of others and will prevent you from accusations of intellectual theft and plagiarism.

It allows the reader to follow an idea, using the details provided, to locate the original publication. This could be because the reader is interested in the topic or because they wish to verify the details of the quotation, making sure the author hasn't been taken out of context.

See the CDU Library tab on Plagiarism. This guide provides links to CDU policies regarding plagiarism and some resources to help you avoid it.

Test your skills

Online animated tutorial created by the University of Sydney.

What's My Style?

Which referencing style do I need to use for my assignments?

  • ACIKE: CDU Harvard

  • Business: CDU Harvard

  • Clinical Sciences: CDU Harvard

  • Common Units: APA 6th

  • Education: APA 6th

  • Engineering and IT: CDU Harvard  or IEEE

  • Health: APA 6th

  • Law AGLC Australian Guide to Legal Citation (AGLC)

  • Pharmacy: Vancouver or NLM style

  • Psychology: APA 6th

Identify your School style. Different disciplines tend to prefer different referencing styles.

Always check with your lecturer which style you should use, as they may like you to use a certain style

Referencing FAQs

What style should I use?

Before you write your list of references/bibliography check with your lecturer/tutor for the bibliographic style they prefer.

How do I order my references?

For CDU Harvard and APA 6th your references should appear at the end of your essay/report with entries listed alphabetically by author's family name (or by title if there is no author).

For example

Campbell, K 2004, Family food environments as determinants of children's eating: Implications for obesity prevention, PhD thesis, Deakin University, Geelong.

Robertson, J 2007, ‘Online boost for training options’, The Courier Mail, 22 October.

What details do I need to record?

This will vary according to each style. In general your references should identify an item (book, journal article, web page) in sufficient detail so that others may identify and consult it.

How do I include a long quotation?

When directly quoting or paraphrasing a section of text,you will need to include page (for print) or paragraph (for electronic) numbers.

If a quotation is longer than 40 words, indent it from the rest of the text as a block quotation. Do not use quotation marks.

I have found a quote in a resource written by another author, how do I quote it?

What is a secondary citation? If you wish to cite from a work quoted in another source (written by a different author), you need to give the details of the source that you found the reference in. This is called a Secondary Citation

If you wish to cite from a work quoted in another source, you need to give the details of the source that you found the reference in e.g. Chu, according to Burgmann, found ....
The reference list would then only refer to Burgmann's publication.E.g.

Burgmann, P 1998, 'Referencing: a critical issue facing students today', Journal of Academic Writing , no. 27, pp. 18-9.

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